Kopf um Krone ist ein ehrenamtliches Projekt, dass sich ausschließlich durch Spenden unserer treuen LeserInnen finanziert.
Gespräch N° 40 | Kabinett

Monica Macovei

„Wollen wir ein freies Europa, müssen wir mehr zahlen”

„Ich habe nicht darum gebeten, Justizministerin zu werden – ich wollte politische Korruption bekämpfen“ – Monica Macovei, ehemals rumänische Justizministerin, ist Russlands Einfluss auf die Europäische Union ein Dorn im Auge. Warum die Abgeordnete zum Europäischen Parlament Atomkraftwerke wichtig findet, Flüchtlinge nicht die zentrale Bedrohung für Europa sind und welche Rolle „Fake News“ in der russischen Propagandastrategie spielen, diskutiert sie mit Katharina Zangerl.

(Hinweis: Das Gespräch wurde ursprünglich in englischer Sprache geführt.)
Lesezeit: 15 Minuten
Das Gespräch führte Katharina Zangerl und erschien am 08.08.2017, fotografiert hat Daniela De Lorenzo.
Katharina Zangerl
We are hearing a lot of news on the relations between the EU and Russia – be it within the Ukraine conflict or the Merkel-Putin relations. Also, you are leading an initiative in the EU Parliament urging the High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy Federica Mogherini to call out Russia’s influence in the EU. [note: read Ms Macovei’s appeal to Federica Mogherini in full text here] Can you share your take on the current relations between the EU and Russia?
Monica Macovei
Right now the relations between the EU and Russia are very difficult, and at a cross-point. This is mainly due to the illegal Russian attacks against Ukraine, the violation of the Minsk Protocol by Russia, the still on-going war in eastern Ukraine and Russia’s involvement in Syria. All these reasons are making the relations difficult.
Katharina Zangerl
Neither Ukraine nor Syria are part of the EU. How can both of them affect the relations between the EU and Russia? How can Russia’s foreign policy influence our relations with the country?
Monica Macovei
Just like Russia has a foreign policy, the EU has a foreign policy too. The EU wants to export and promote democracy and values such as the rule of law, while Russia is trying to destroy all these.
Katharina Zangerl
That is a very Eurocentric perspective. I don’t think Putin would argue in the same way?
Monica Macovei
I don’t know what he is trying to promote. It certainly can’t be democracy as there is barely one in Russia. In Russia he is the only one who makes the decisions. And his interest – in my view – is reclaiming the Russian influence in the countries that used to be part of the Soviet Union. And that’s a long-term project. I even dare to bet that they have been working on this plan since 1990.
Katharina Zangerl
In other words: expansionism?
Monica Macovei
Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russia is planning to get back all that’s been lost. But this time it probably won’t happen with tanks but through other means, like propaganda.

© Daniela De Lorenzo

Katharina Zangerl
Can you explain what you mean with Russian propaganda? Are you talking about fake news?
Monica Macovei
Through “Sputnik” and “Russia Today” for instance. They broadcast in almost every language spoken in the countries they try to influence. You can compare it with the BBC, which provided an alternative to state-controlled propaganda in ex-communist countries during the post-cold war era.
Katharina Zangerl
So what is the difference between Russian propaganda and information sharing across borders?
Monica Macovei
Language. The BBC didn’t broadcast in Ukrainian or Romanian. It didn’t address Romanian or Moldavian politics. “Sputnik” and “Russia Today” do. What’s the point in doing so? The aim is to convince people that the idea of European integration has failed the post-communist countries. And this results in hate among different categories of people.
Katharina Zangerl
Why would that be in Russia’s interest?
Monica Macovei
That is how you conquer territories and people.
Katharina Zangerl
I’m just wondering why Russia is trying to expand its influence despite having huge internal problems itself. Russia is not in a good state right now –
Monica Macovei
The very moment we got rid of communism, they wanted their influence, their power back. National pride is the driving factor of the desire to become a big power. Being a big power means influence. I mean, any country would like to expand its political and economic influence over other countries. That’s reality. That’s life.
Katharina Zangerl
Well, in foreign policy everybody wants to get stronger, nobody wants to become weaker. And that’s essentially what the EU is doing too. We are also expanding continuously.
Monica Macovei
Yes, we want to expand – we’ve also stopped for a while. I hope we will continue growing. Furthermore, we want to spread democracy and values. We are very advanced with the Republic of Moldova for example. We also try to help Ukraine to their benefit. After all, democracy is a benefit to the people. Besides giving money, the European Union provides values too.
Katharina Zangerl
If that is the case, how can we justify talking about democracy when Hungary, a member state, is gradually dismantling it?
Monica Macovei
This is another discussion. As an institution, the EU has the interest to expand democracy and its values. The EU aims to assist countries in their development. Only developed countries with roads, trains, functional administration, no corruption, and so on, are safe countries. And we want safe countries in Europe, because safe countries reduce the probability of war.
Katharina Zangerl
The initiative you are leading in the European Parliament against Russian influence in the EU is interesting. Let’s talk about the concerns and intentions that lie behind it.
Monica Macovei
We addressed the letter to Ms Mogherini. It was my initiative. And we are gaining the support of an increasing number of colleagues. All this started in April 2017. In this letter we explain very nicely what price had been paid to get out of communism and how many people lost their lives. After all that struggle, we express our happiness that new democracies joined the EU. This is the reason why we wrote this letter to “StratCom”, which is a subdivision of the “European External Service”, chaired by Ms Mogherini. “StratCom” is a unit within the “European External Action Service” created with the aim to counter Russian propaganda, as it is currently expanding in all European countries. As of today, there are only eleven people working in this unit, out of these only two are dealing with inadmissible and outrageous Russian propaganda.
Katharina Zangerl
But doesn’t the low number of people dealing with Russian propaganda indicate how it is not seen as a threat?
Monica Macovei
The very existence of such a unit and its mandate countering Russian propaganda proves that it is seen as a threat. The “European External Action Service” sees it as a threat, thus making it a little bit worrying that there are only two people working on this issue. We must not create institutions that will not function due to insufficient resources.
Katharina Zangerl
In the letter you wrote, you are calling for more than just increased funding for “StratCom”. You are actually asking Ms Mogherini to publicly speak about Russian influence in Europe, right? This worries me. I doubt that increased tension will do the troubling relations with Russia any good. When we call this out publicly, we increase the tension and I wonder: Do we really need more tension between the EU and Russia? Don’t increasingly unreliable partners such as Turkey or the United States already strain our capacity? Wouldn’t an appeasement policy towards Russia be more beneficial to us?
Monica Macovei
Talks with Russia and its representatives take place all the time. But when Russia doesn’t talk publicly about this, and we do nothing, we are waiting in a death row, because it will go on with its strong propaganda, spreading fake news all over Europe, expanding it to even more countries, and as a consequence threatening the very existence of the EU. Their narrative will be ‘Everything coming from the EU is bad!’ No matter how they put it – whether in a straight or more sophisticated way – that’s essentially their message. The division of people is conducted by populist extremist parties, created and funded by Russia. Macron said after the elections that “Russia Today” and “Sputnik” were meddling in the elections in favour of Marine Le Pen. The same can be observed in other EU countries – not only that, they even try to influence politics there. All that’s done in order to get control over these countries. Simply put, fund a populist extremist party that wins, and you will have control over that country. We saw it in the United States and in Hungary, where Orban and “Jobbik” –
Katharina Zangerl
Is there cooperation between Russia and Orban?
Monica Macovei
It’s a very strong cooperation. Orban doesn’t want to respect the laws and values of the European Union. Just look at the recent events: He forbid foreign universities registering in Hungary, restricted foreign professors and students and took away external funding from the NGOs. This move effectively kills NGOs as they don’t want to receive governmental money or funds from corporations.
Katharina Zangerl
But again, you say Russia is a threat because it funds destabilising political parties and media outlets –
Monica Macovei
It’s a threat, because Russia wants to take over control of as many news outlets as possible. It also tries to destabilise the EU by getting straight into political and financial control of some member states. This results in a reduction and destabilisation of the EU, thus making it internationally less relevant. Orban, though, doesn’t care that Russians are at work, no, he has his own political ambitions.
Katharina Zangerl
What impact do you consider Putin’s personality has in this? Do you think it is Russia’s national interest to have someone like Orban in Hungary and hence in the middle of the EU?
Monica Macovei
I think it’s his personality, his wish in a sense. It’s a pretty simple game – instead of food, you give people what you would call “national pride” – ‘We need to be bigger, more territories!’ But at the end of the day, you can live without or less food for a while – not for long though. It’s not even a real national pride, because there is no pride in making propaganda and fake news.
Katharina Zangerl
We have sanctions against Russia – more specifically against specific Russian and Ukrainian individuals and organisations. As for now, this approach is not working well despite being in place for more than two years.
Monica Macovei
That’s an answer to your question why I asked Mogherini to come out publicly. We impose sanctions – and they still do what they do, but with more force. What else shall we do?
Katharina Zangerl
We should go the other way!
Monica Macovei
I don’t agree.
Katharina Zangerl
Why not? We need partners!
Monica Macovei
I still see people from the West who don’t understand how Russia functions. Russia will never give up on what was theirs, and they will do anything to get it back – regardless the economic situation in Russia.
Katharina Zangerl
Let’s elevate this to an international relations perspective. Wouldn’t it be smarter to say ‘Let’s work together! We can be become neighbours with really good economic relations’? I don’t see the point in worsening the conflict –
Monica Macovei
They increased the conflict – we didn’t. This doesn’t mean that there’s no cooperation with Russia at all – it used to be better though. And don’t forget: They started with Crimea –
Katharina Zangerl
Which was a bit our fault too, considering the NATO extension for example –
Monica Macovei
What you say means the work has to go around Russian issues –
Katharina Zangerl
No, I’m implying that the whole world has to work for peace.
Monica Macovei
NATO was expanded in times of peace, for the sake of this world’s safety. If this had not happened, we would experience another war, people dying. Yes, it is positive that NATO expanded, since it helped keeping peace.
Katharina Zangerl
But people are dying now in Ukraine because of that.
Monica Macovei
That’s not the reason.
Katharina Zangerl
Why is that not the reason? Ukraine as a sovereign state, decided to turn pro-European and take the European road rather than the Russian one. Then something happened – I assume it was corruption that made Yanukovych change his mind on the Pro-European path –, as a result people went on the streets and protested in Maidan (note: Майдан Незалежності; Independence Place in Kiev), demanding closer ties with the European Union –
Monica Macovei
All that happened when Yanukovych refused to sign the association agreement with European Union – and people took it to the streets. And I have great admiration for them. It was winter and they stayed on the streets for many days – freezing.
Katharina Zangerl
Like the Romanians in January –
Monica Macovei
The Ukrainians stayed longer – and even rejected an international agreement, which is unique. Do you remember the agreement between the Americans, Germans and the EU that let Yanukovych stay in office for the remainder of his term? The people rejected it – and they didn’t leave the streets. This forced these big powers to change their opinion. This shows, people can change things, if they want to.

© Daniela De Lorenzo

Katharina Zangerl
To go back to the Russian propaganda; the people on streets showed that they resist Russian propaganda. So why should we be scared of it?
Monica Macovei
You can’t live on the streets. You have to return to your job.
Katharina Zangerl
You say that Russia gains influence by spreading fake news, funding right-wing parties all over Europe. You want to fight the fake news, whereas I personally think the latter is the biggest threat, because once you get to the political system –
Monica Macovei
– you control the country. Corrupt authorities make it even much easier to take over institutions. Corruption leads to dysfunctionality. So to me and to many of us, the time of discussion and diplomacy … well, I can’t say it’s over – we still do it –  but it’s obvious that we can’t stay like this, awaiting the results of diplomacy. Diplomacy takes its time. However, what Russia did shows that Putin doesn’t care about the EU. He got even stronger as the EU failed to install sanctions quickly in response to the Crimea crisis. It is true that we now have sanctions, and the EU even prolonged them, but we can’t tell whether they are effective or not. The situation could be worse without them. He could have been encouraged to pursue his plans much quicker and more aggressive. The opposite may be true – who knows. We shouldn’t make assumptions.
Katharina Zangerl
The history of the EU proves that more integrated economic cooperation, closer ties promote long-term peace and stability. Why aren’t we trying to get a more cooperative, more pro-European class in power in Russia?
Monica Macovei
Do we elect the Russian government? Do we participate in elections there?
Katharina Zangerl
Of course not, but you can support people with economic relations, can’t you? Let’s assume I’m in the EU and trading with people in Russia and our business is thriving. Why shouldn’t these businesses promote continuous good relations with the EU, right? And if I were Russian and powerful enough, I can advocate for this. Putin is not going to live forever, things can change.
Monica Macovei
The majority of people in Russia seem to support Putin, while the marginal opposition gets killed, incarcerated and so on.
Katharina Zangerl
A similar development can be observed in Turkey as well. But we are not reacting to these developments in the same manner. Would you agree that we are not acting strategically, that what we are doing is not smart –
Monica Macovei
That’s how you make us lose.
Katharina Zangerl
Explain me how?
Monica Macovei
I heard Western colleagues saying in 2013 – when the Crimea crisis happened – not to bother, Putin will destroy his country economically within a year. On the contrary, a Polish spy assessed with certainty that Putin attempts destroying the EU, because the Polish know what it means to be under Russian rule, how they lie, how they pretend that white is black and black is white, how they break every promise. He suggested that no deal can be reached with Russia; that no foreign policy can be made on the basis of a deal with Russia.
Katharina Zangerl
So what do you propose? What would be the ideal solution?
Monica Macovei
We have to answer this imminent big threat to our political apparatus which is Russian propaganda. Countering divisive fake news aiming to persuade people that ‘the EU is bad’ is crucial.
Katharina Zangerl
Give me an example.
Monica Macovei
It’s like divide and conquer – that’s what they do. Russian propaganda is one big threat, Europe’s dependency on Russian utilities another.
Katharina Zangerl
So what do we do about that? We don’t want to have it cold in the winter, do we?
Monica Macovei
I hope you don’t suggest the notion that in order to avoid freezing in the winter, we should accept Russian control over us through energy – because that’s what they are trying to do with their gas.
Katharina Zangerl
Do you have any suggestions?
Monica Macovei
The solution is to find alternative energy supplies. This can be achieved by importing from Norway or – in my view – by nuclear plants, for example.
Katharina Zangerl
The latter is terribly unpopular in Europe, especially in Austria.
Monica Macovei
It has become terribly unpopular because there were many campaigns against nuclear plants, I know. You know, my point of view is an opinion. Maybe nuclear plants cannot be as safe as I believe – maybe I’ll have to invest more time in research. Be assured, I get the arguments about Chernobyl and Fukushima, but please bear in mind that these were extraordinary tragedies. If nuclear plants are built and designed properly, they produce electricity safely. We can also increase funding in green energy research. However, I doubt that green energy will sufficiently meet the demand.
Katharina Zangerl
But Norwegian gas is neither cheap nor sufficient for all of us.
Monica Macovei
Look, do we want a free Europe? Then we have to pay more.
Katharina Zangerl
From our conversation so far, I can see that you make a distinction between Russia’s development and the one in Turkey. I get the impression that you are influenced in your assessment, maybe even emotional due to the historical connection between Russia and Romania. Unlike with Russia, for Turkey you are not calling for a more confrontational course. Is it because we want Turkey to keep the refugees that we ignore Erdogan killing his democracy and incarcerating journalists?
Monica Macovei
I disagree. Erdogan will never let these millions of refugees leave Turkey, because they will vote for him once he gradually grants them citizenship. You have to think about that.
Katharina Zangerl
Are you suggesting that we as the EU are not in a situation of blackmail by the current Turkish administration?
Monica Macovei
He tries to do so, of course – but we always have to keep in mind what the intentions are. After what he is been doing in Turkey, not many will vote in favour of him. Secondly, he can use the refugees to fight the Kurds. So it is in his interest to keep them. If he blackmails us with refugees, we laugh in his face. Nevertheless, we want to avoid Turkey becoming to close with Russia – but for other reasons.
Katharina Zangerl
And that is happening right now?
Monica Macovei
That’s happening right now. We need to know that this blackmailing is not real. We should condemn Turkey for what is happening – judges and educators in prison, businesses confiscated and nationalised. And at some point we can’t rely on diplomacy alone. Things are complicated –

© Daniela De Lorenzo

Katharina Zangerl
So again, you think that Russia crossed the line? How about Turkey?
Monica Macovei
Both of them. The EU gave both of them conditions to respect, and both failed to do so. Now we have to deal with Russia and Turkey at the same time. Russia tries anything possible to counter the EU – this includes energy, propaganda and even closer relations with Turkey, making them turn their back on the EU. This is the real danger – not the possible influx of a million refugees. And then there are the United States and the apparently close link between Putin and Trump. We discover more details about that every day. But I think that the American people are relatively immune to those things as they have a strong spirit of freedom and democracy. I doubt that President Trump will ever be able to change this. We have witnessed how active the American people are. They didn’t stay in their homes, they demonstrated on an almost daily basis. In Europe we barely see demonstrations – Romania is one of the few exceptions.
Katharina Zangerl
You just mentioned the spirit of democracy and that it’s not easily killed –
Monica Macovei
It is not easily killed in the US.
Katharina Zangerl
Doesn’t that account for democracies overall? If this works in the US, it should work anywhere. Once people enjoy freedom, it’s hard to believe that they would want to give it up.
Monica Macovei
I don’t see the same situation here. I think it’s due to cultural differences.
Katharina Zangerl
If I were you, I wouldn’t be so negative. Look at Romania! It is heart-warming how actively people there were fighting for their beliefs. It was winter; people stood up against corruption and refused to step down. Isn’t this the ultimate proof that there is no reason to be scared of some Russian propaganda? Why would a strong civil society that obviously likes living in a vibrant democracy fall for Russian propaganda?
Monica Macovei
(thinks for a while) There are some differences in society. Society is never uniform. There were people against the demonstrations too. Look at the results of the elections in Romania.
Katharina Zangerl
Wouldn’t you agree that voting results are also influenced by media reporting and that democratic voices are perceived as too “elitist” by rural people, people that didn’t have the chance to go abroad, people that live in poverty. That’s not Russian propaganda.
Monica Macovei
This explains why there is still fragility inside European societies. Yes, I am very happy about what happened in Romania. I am happy that there was a brave group standing up against something terrible. And I hope they will do it again when another bad thing occurs. The demonstrators were able to stop the government from passing those bad laws that night, but it’s not over – they will try it again another time. So we have to fight all the time.
Katharina Zangerl
But they are willing to resist and fight! Isn’t that beautiful?
Monica Macovei
Yes, it’s beautiful, but we need to win! Someone loses, someone wins. We want to win. We want to win in all these countries.
Katharina Zangerl
And you say Russia is a hindrance to that?
Monica Macovei
It is. I remember in 2012 – it was on “Russia Today “– they said that the Romanian socialists have to get rid of three people, the three enemies of the socialists – and one of them was me, because I was speaking freely against how the socialist and liberals violated the rule of law back then. So that’s how Russia functions. Now again: It was difficult to become a democracy, in particular for countries coming from communism, and democracy is easy to lose. I remember a decision of the Supreme Court of the United States back in the sixties arguing that the biggest danger to democracy are inert people – a people that does not react, does not take it to the streets, that just waits that things change by themselves –
Katharina Zangerl
But EU citizens generally are not inert, in particular the Romanians. They are very awake.
Monica Macovei
Yes, and I’m very proud of my country and of them. Take a look at Hungary for example. Much worse things are happening there, and everybody is staying at home. A Hungarian journalist said: “I’m so envious. Why did Romanians went out on the streets, and Hungarians did not?” This assessment makes me even prouder of my compatriots, my Romanians. Still, nothing is won yet. Those old, corrupt political parties are still there, and they still do anything they can to secure their power. We need to change the electoral laws, enabling others – maybe those protesters that want to join politics. But I’m not sure if they really consider doing that. And please don’t misunderstand me, I’m not pessimistic, I’m optimistic when it comes to democracies in Europe. If I were not, I wouldn’t continue fighting. But after a long endeavour in Bosnia, in Kosovo, working as a human rights lawyer for the OSCE, jobs from Ukraine over Russia to Albania, serving as Minister of Justice in Romania, implementing anti-corruption measures against politicians – even against some of my colleagues in the government – I gained a lot of experience that tells me the following: Be prepared for the worst! Those who are taken by surprise will be lost and lose. Besides, I’m of the opinion that one must take risk. Because nothing can be done without risk. And if you dream big like those protesters did in Ukraine and in Romania, act big. Don’t ever stop, look ahead, and follow your dream!
Katharina Zangerl
So putting this in the context of your initiative, you are acting big when planning to confront Russia?
Monica Macovei
No, it is not about confronting Russia – that’s not my objective. I’m saying: When you want to reach for something big, for instance keeping democracy in your country, fighting against those who threaten democracy, which could be Russia, but also corrupt politicians, you must not be afraid. Fear paralyses you, stops you from doing anything. So don’t be afraid to fail. The more you fail, the more you are going to learn. Fail seven times, get up eight times. Now imagine the opposite: If you don’t dare anything in your life, how is life going to be?
Katharina Zangerl
Is it the kind of dare to fail mixed with ambition and idealism that keeps you going?
Monica Macovei
I can be strong and stubborn. I remember the time when I was Minister of Justice in Romania, I had to co-sign every law to prove its legality. My colleagues were often nervous about my signature, and whether I would grant it. There were many situations when I refused to sign. Once the Prime Minister even sent me out of the room and told me to reconsider my decision for half an hour. Before leaving the room, I turned around and told him, “But it won’t be legal in half an hour”. So that’s what I am saying. They couldn’t do anything to me but fire me, and that would have been okay. I didn’t ask to be the Minister of Justice, I wanted to fight political corruption.
Katharina Zangerl
Die Beziehungen zwischen der EU und Russland sind wieder verstärkt in den Medien – sei es nun der Ukraine-Konflikt oder die Merkel-Putin-Beziehung. Abgesehen davon sind Sie in einer Initiative federführend, die die Hohe Vertreterin der Europäischen Union für Außen- und Sicherheitspolitik Federica Mogherini auffordert, Russlands Einfluss innerhalb der EU anzuprangern. [Frau Macoveis Aufruf an Federica Mogherini ist hier im Volltext nachzulesen; Anm.] Können Sie Ihre Sichtweise zu den derzeitigen Beziehungen zwischen der EU und Russland darlegen?
Monica Macovei
Momentan gestalten sich die Beziehungen zwischen der EU und Russland äußerst schwierig. Sie sind an einem Scheideweg. Das ist hauptsächlich das Ergebnis der illegalen russischen Angriffe gegen die Ukraine, der Verletzung des Minsker Protokolls durch Russland, des nach wie vor andauernden Krieges im Osten der Ukraine und Russlands Engagement in Syrien. All das sind Gründe, die die Beziehungen schwierig machen.
Katharina Zangerl
Weder die Ukraine noch Syrien sind Teil der EU. Wie können diese Länder die Beziehungen zwischen der EU und Russland beeinflussen? Wie beeinflusst Russlands Außenpolitik unsere Beziehungen zu Russland?
Monica Macovei
Genauso wie Russland eine Außenpolitik betreibt, betreibt auch die EU eine Außenpolitik. Die EU will Demokratie und Werte wie unter anderem Rechtsstaatlichkeit verbreiten und bewerben, während Russland bestrebt ist, all dies zunichte zu machen.
Katharina Zangerl
Das ist eine sehr eurozentrische Ansicht. Ich glaube nicht, dass Putin ähnlich argumentieren würde – oder?
Monica Macovei
Ich weiß nicht, was er versucht, zu bewerben. Es kann sicherlich nicht die Demokratie sein, da ja kaum eine in Russland vorherrscht. In Russland ist er der einzige, der Entscheidungen fällt. Und es ist – meines Erachtens – in seinem Interesse, den russischen Einfluss in jenen Ländern wieder zu beanspruchen, die einst Teil der Sowjetunion waren. Und das ist ein langfristiges Vorhaben. Ich traue mich sogar zu wetten, dass sie an diesem Plan seit 1990 arbeiten.
Katharina Zangerl
Mit anderen Worten: Expansionismus?
Monica Macovei
Seit dem Zusammenbruch der Sowjetunion versucht Russland all das wieder zurückzuerlangen, das es einmal verloren hat. Aber dieses Mal wird das nicht mit Panzern geschehen, sondern mit anderen Mitteln wie etwa Propaganda.

© Daniela De Lorenzo

Katharina Zangerl
Können Sie ausführen, was Sie mit „russischer Propaganda“ meinen? Sprechen Sie hier von „Fake News“?
Monica Macovei
Mithilfe von „Sputnik“ und „Russia Today“ zum Beispiel. Gesendet wird in fast jeder Sprache, die in den Ländern gesprochen werden, die sie versuchen, zu beeinflussen. Sie können das mit der BBC vergleichen, die in der Zeit nach dem Kalten Krieg eine Alternative zur staatlich-kontrollierten Propaganda in den ex-kommunistischen Ländern darstellte.
Katharina Zangerl
Was unterscheidet also russische Propaganda von Nachrichtenverbreitung über Grenzen hinweg?
Monica Macovei
Sprache – die BBC sendete nicht auf Ukrainisch oder Rumänisch. Sie behandelte keine rumänische oder moldauische Politik, „Sputnik“ und „Russian Today“ schon. Und was bringt das? Das Ziel ist es, die Menschen davon zu überzeugen, dass die Idee der europäischen Integration in den postkommunistischen Ländern gescheitert ist. Das Ergebnis ist Zwietracht zwischen den verschiedenen Gruppen von Menschen.
Katharina Zangerl
Inwiefern ist das im Interesse Russlands?
Monica Macovei
So erobert man Gebiete und Menschen.
Katharina Zangerl
Ich wundere mich nur, weshalb Russland bestrebt ist, trotz seiner großen internen Probleme, seinen Einfluss zu vergrößern. Russland ist derzeit in keiner guten Verfassung …
Monica Macovei
Genau in dem Moment, in dem wir den Kommunismus loswurden, wollten sie ihren Einfluss, ihre Macht zurück. Nationalstolz ist der treibende Faktor des Verlangens, eine Großmacht zu werden. Eine Großmacht zu sein, bedeutet Einfluss. Ich meine damit, dass jedes Land seinen politischen und wirtschaftlichen Einfluss über andere Länder erweitern möchte. Das ist die Realität. So ist das Leben.
Katharina Zangerl
Nun, außenpolitisch will jeder stärker, niemand schwächer werden. Und das ist im Prinzip das, was auch die EU macht. Wir expandieren kontinuierlich.
Monica Macovei
Ja, wir wollen expandieren – wir haben aber auch eine Weile aufgehört. Ich hoffe, dass wir weiterwachsen. Weiters wollen wir Demokratie und Werte verbreiten. Wir sind diesbezüglich zum Beispiel sehr fortgeschritten in der Republik Moldau. Wir versuchen auch der Ukraine zu ihrem Vorteil zu helfen. Alles in allem ist für die Menschen die Demokratie von Vorteil. Abseits von Geldmitteln stellt die Europäische Union auch Werte zur Verfügung.
Katharina Zangerl
Wenn das der Fall ist, ist es dann gerechtfertigt, dass wir über Demokratie sprechen, obwohl Ungarn, ein Mitgliedsstaat, sie derzeit allmählich abbaut?
Monica Macovei
Das ist ein anderes Thema. Als eine Institution hat die EU das Interesse, Demokratie und ihre Werte zu verbreiten. Die EU hat sich zum Ziel gemacht, Länder in ihrer Entwicklung zu unterstützen. Nur entwickelte Länder mit Straßen, Zügen, funktionierender Verwaltung, keiner Korruption, und so weiter, sind sichere Länder. Und wir wollen sichere Länder in Europa, weil sichere Länder die Wahrscheinlichkeit von Krieg senken.
Katharina Zangerl
Die Initiative, die Sie im Europaparlament gegen den russischen Einfluss in der EU führen, ist interessant. Sprechen wir über die dieser zugrundeliegenden Anliegen und Hintergrundgedanken!
Monica Macovei
Wir richteten den Brief an Frau Mogherini. Er war meine Initiative. Und wir erfahren immer mehr Unterstützung von Kollegen. All dies begann im April 2017. In dem Brief erklären wir sehr deutlich, welcher Preis gezahlt wurde, um dem Kommunismus zu entkommen und wie viele Menschen ihr Leben verloren haben. Nach all den Schwierigkeiten zeigen wir, wie glücklich wir darüber sind, dass neue Demokratien der EU beitraten. Das ist der Grund, weshalb wir diesen Brief an „StratCom“ geschickt haben, ein Teil des „Europäischen Auswärtigen Dienstes“, dem Frau Mogherini vorsitzt. „StratCom“ ist eine Einheit innerhalb des „Europäischen Auswärtigen Dienstes“, die mit dem Ziel geschaffen wurde, gegen russische Propaganda vorzugehen, die sich momentan in allen europäischen Ländern ausbreitet. Derzeit arbeiten nur elf Personen in dieser Einheit, und von diesen beschäftigen sich nur zwei mit der unzulässigen und unverschämten russischen Propaganda.
Katharina Zangerl
Aber legt die niedrige Anzahl an Personen, die mit der russischen Propaganda befasst sind, nicht nahe, dass diese eben nicht als Gefahr gesehen wird?
Monica Macovei
Allein dass es eine solche Einheit und ihr Mandat, gegen russische Propaganda vorzugehen, gibt, beweist, dass sie als Gefahr gesehen wird. Der „Europäische Auswärtige Dienst“ sieht sie als Gefahr, und daher ist es ein wenig besorgniserregend, dass einmal gerade zwei Personen in diesem Gebiet tätig sind. Wir dürfen keine Institutionen schaffen, die aufgrund von unzureichenden Mitteln nicht funktionieren.
Katharina Zangerl
In dem Brief, den Sie verfassten, fordern Sie weitaus mehr als nur mehr Mittel für „StratCom“. Sie fordern Frau Mogherini praktisch dazu auf, öffentlich über den russischen Einfluss in Europa zu sprechen, nicht? Das bereitet mir Sorgen. Ich zweifle daran, dass verstärkte Spannungen den schwierigen Beziehungen auch nur irgendwie guttun. Wenn wir anfangen, dies öffentlich anzuprangern, verschlimmern wir die Spannungen. Und ich frage mich, ob wir wirklich mehr Spannungen zwischen der EU und Russland nötig haben? Beanspruchen zunehmend unverlässliche Partner wie die Türkei oder die Vereinigten Staaten uns nicht bereits sehr stark? Wäre eine Beschwichtigungspolitik gegenüber Russland nicht vorteilhafter für uns?
Monica Macovei
Gespräche mit Russland und seinen Repräsentanten finden ständig statt. Aber wenn Russland nicht öffentlich darüber spricht, und wir zugleich nichts unternehmen, sitzen wir im Todestrakt, weil Russland mit seiner heftigen Propaganda, mit dem Verbreiten von Fake News in ganz Europa weitermachen wird, und all das sogar auf noch mehr Länder ausweitet, sodass infolgedessen nichts anderes als die Existenz der EU gefährdet ist. Sie werden sagen: „Alles, was von der EU kommt, ist schlecht!“. Egal wie sie es darstellen, ob offen oder in einer gehobeneren Art, ist genau das ihre Nachricht. Die Spaltung der Menschen erfolgt mithilfe von populistischen, extremistischen Parteien, die von Russland gefördert und finanziert werden. Macron sagte nach der Wahl, dass „Russia Today“ und „Sputnik“ sich zugunsten Marine Le Pens in die Wahl eingemischt hätten. Dasselbe sieht man auch in anderen EU-Ländern – nicht nur das; sie versuchen auch die dortige Politik zu beeinflussen. All das wird mit dem Ziel vorangetrieben, Kontrolle über diese Länder zu erlangen. Vereinfacht gesagt: finanziere eine populistische, extremistische Partei, die gewinnt, und man erhält die Kontrolle über den betreffenden Staat. Wir haben es in den Vereinigten Staaten und in Ungarn gesehen, wo Orban und „Jobbik“ …
Katharina Zangerl
Arbeiten Russland und Orban zusammen?
Monica Macovei
Es ist eine sehr enge Zusammenarbeit. Orban respektiert die Regeln und Werte der Europäischen Union nicht. Schauen Sie sich die jüngsten Ereignisse an: Er untersagte ausländischen Universitäten die Registrierung in Ungarn, schränkte ausländische Professoren und Studenten ein und nahm den NGOs die externe Finanzierung weg. Mit diesem Schritt werden die NGOs effektiv ausgeschalten, weil diese keine Regierungsgelder oder Mittel von Unternehmen wollen.
Katharina Zangerl
Nochmals, Sie sagen, dass Russland eine Gefahr sei, weil es destabilisierende Parteien und Medien finanziert …
Monica Macovei
Es ist eine Gefahr, weil Russland so viele Medienanstalten wie möglich kontrollieren will. Es versucht zudem die EU zu destabilisieren, indem es unmittelbar die politische und finanzielle Kontrolle einiger Mitgliedsstaaten übernimmt. Das resultiert in einer Destabilisierung der EU, wodurch sie international an Bedeutung verliert. Orban jedoch kümmert es nicht, ob die Russen am Werk sind, nein, er hat eigene politische Ambitionen.
Katharina Zangerl
Wie bewerten Sie den Einfluss von Putins Persönlichkeit in dieser Angelegenheit? Glauben Sie, dass es im nationalen Interesse Russlands ist, dass es jemanden wie Orban in Ungarn hat, und damit jemanden in der Mitte der EU?
Monica Macovei
Ich glaube, es ist seine Personalität, gewissermaßen sein Wunsch. Es ist ein ziemlich einfaches Spiel. Anstatt von Essen, gibt man den Menschen etwas, das man als „Nationalstolz“ bezeichnet – „Wir müssen größer sein, mehr Gebiete!“. Aber am Ende des Tages kann man eine Zeit lang ohne beziehungsweise weniger Essen überleben – nicht lange wohlgemerkt. Es ist nicht einmal echter Nationalstolz, da Stolz nicht mit der Erzeugung von Propaganda und Fake News einhergeht.
Katharina Zangerl
Wir haben Sanktionen gegen Russland – genauer gesagt gegen russische und ukrainische Personen und Organisationen. Wenn wir uns diese heute anschauen, müssen wir feststellen, dass dieser Zugang nicht funktioniert, obwohl wir diesen bereits seit mehr als zwei Jahren verfolgen.
Monica Macovei
Das ist eine Antwort zu Ihrer Frage, warum ich Frau Mogherini ersuchte, öffentlich darüber zu sprechen. Wir sanktionieren – und sie machen nach wie vor weiter mit dem, was sie tun, nur mit mehr Gewalt. Was sollen wir sonst tun?
Katharina Zangerl
Wir sollten in die andere Richtung gehen!
Monica Macovei
Ich stimme dem nicht zu.
Katharina Zangerl
Wieso nicht? Wir brauchen Partner!
Monica Macovei
Ich beobachte immer wieder, wie Menschen aus dem Westen nicht verstehen, wie Russland funktioniert. Russland wird niemals aufgeben, was einst ihm gehörte, und es wird alles daransetzen, es zurückzubekommen – ungeachtet der wirtschaftlichen Lage in Russland.
Katharina Zangerl
Heben wir die Sache auf die Ebene der internationalen Beziehungen! Wäre es dann nicht klüger, zu sagen: „Lasst uns zusammenarbeiten! Wir könnten Nachbarn mit wirklich guten Wirtschaftsbeziehungen werden!“? Ich kann nicht nachvollziehen, weshalb eine Verschlimmerung des Konflikts sinnvoll sein soll …
Monica Macovei
Russland verschlimmerte den Konflikt, nicht wir. Das bedeutet nicht, dass es überhaupt keine Zusammenarbeit mit Russland gibt – es war aber schon einmal besser. Und nicht vergessen: Es begann mit der Krim …
Katharina Zangerl
Was zum Teil auch unsere Schuld war, wenn man zum Beispiel die NATO-Erweiterung berücksichtigt …
Monica Macovei
Sie sagen damit, dass man um russlandbezogene Angelegenheiten herum arbeiten muss …
Katharina Zangerl
Nein, ich implizierte damit, dass die ganze Welt für Frieden arbeiten muss.
Monica Macovei
Die NATO wurde in Friedenszeiten erweitert – im Sinne der weltweiten Sicherheit. Wenn das nicht passiert wäre, würden wir einen weiteren Krieg erleben, in dem Menschen sterben. Ja, es ist etwas Gutes, dass die NATO größer wurde, da sie so half, den Frieden zu sichern.
Katharina Zangerl
Aber genau deswegen sterben Menschen derzeit in der Ukraine.
Monica Macovei
Das ist nicht der Grund.
Katharina Zangerl
Was ist dann der Grund? Die Ukraine entschied sich als souveräner Staat proeuropäisch zu werden und somit den europäischen Weg dem russischen vorzuziehen. Dann geschah irgendwas – ich nehme an, es war Korruption, die Janukowytsch dazu brachte, seine Meinung bezüglich des proeuropäischen Weges zu ändern –, das die Menschen veranlasste, auf die Straßen zu gehen und engere Beziehungen zur Europäischen Union einfordernd am Maidan (Майдан Незалежності; Unabhängigkeitsplatz in Kiew; Anm.) zu protestieren.
Monica Macovei
All das geschah, als Janukowytsch sich weigerte, das Assoziierungsabkommen mit der Europäischen Union zu unterzeichnen, weshalb die Leute dann auf die Straße gingen. Und ich hege große Bewunderung für sie. Es war Winter und sie verharrten auf den Straßen für viele Tage – frierend.
Katharina Zangerl
So wie die Rumänen im Jänner …
Monica Macovei
Die Ukrainer blieben länger und lehnten sogar ein internationales Abkommen ab – ein einzigartiges Vorgehen. Erinnern Sie sich an das Abkommen zwischen US-Amerikanern, Deutschen und der EU, das vorsah, Janukowytsch bis zum Ende seiner Amtszeit im Amt zu lassen? Die Menschen lehnten es  ab – und verließen die Straßen nicht. Das zwang die Großmächte zum Umdenken. Das zeigt, dass Menschen Dinge ändern können, wenn sie wollen.

© Daniela De Lorenzo

Katharina Zangerl
Um wieder auf die russische Propaganda zurückzukommen: Die Menschen auf den Straßen beweisen, dass sie sich russischer Propaganda widersetzten. Wieso sollten wir uns also davor fürchten?
Monica Macovei
Man kann nicht auf der Straße leben. Man muss zu seiner Arbeit zurückkehren.
Katharina Zangerl
Sie sagen, dass Russland mithilfe der Verbreitung von Fake News, der Finanzierung von rechten Parteien in ganz Europa an Einfluss gewinnt. Sie wollen Fake News bekämpfen, wobei ich persönlich glaube, dass letzteres die größte Gefahr ist, denn sobald man Zugang zum politischen System hat, …
Monica Macovei
… kontrolliert man das Land. Korrupte Behörden machen es einem noch leichter, Institutionen zu übernehmen. Korruption führt zur Dysfunktionalität. Folglich ist für mich und viele andere die Zeit des Diskutierens und der Diplomatie … nun ja, ich kann nicht sagen, dass sie vorbei ist, immerhin betreiben wir sie noch, aber es ist offensichtlich, dass wir nicht so verbleiben können, um die Resultate der Diplomatie abzuwarten. Diplomatie braucht ihre Zeit. Ungeachtet dessen zeigt das, was Russland tut, dass es die EU nicht interessiert.  Der russische Einfluss wurde sogar stärker, als die EU daran scheiterte, zügig Sanktionen in Reaktion auf die Krim-Krise auszusprechen. Es trifft zu, dass wir jetzt Sanktionen haben – und die EU hat sie sogar verlängert –, aber wir können nicht sagen, ob sie wirken oder nicht. Die Lage könnte ohne sie schlimmer sein oder er hätte dadurch ermutigt sein können, seine Pläne noch schneller und noch aggressiver anzugehen. Das Gegenteil mag zutreffen, wer weiß. Wir sollten keine Annahmen treffen.
Katharina Zangerl
Die Geschichte der EU zeigt, dass durch eine verstärkt integrierte wirtschaftliche Zusammenarbeit engere Länderkooperationen begünstigt werden, wodurch langfristig Frieden und Stabilität entsteht. Wieso versuchen wir dann nicht, in Russland eine kooperativere, proeuropäischere Klasse an die Macht zu bringen?
Monica Macovei
Wählen wir die russische Regierung? Nehmen wir an den dortigen Wahlen teil?
Katharina Zangerl
Natürlich nicht. Aber man kann jene mit guten Wirtschaftsbeziehungen unterstützen, nicht? Nehmen wir an, dass ich in der EU ansässig bin, mit Personen in Russland handle und unsere Geschäfte gut laufen, wieso sollten diese Unternehmer dann nicht für den Erhalt der guten Beziehungen mit der EU einstehen? Und wäre ich Russin und mächtig genug, würde ich dafür plädieren. Putin wird nicht ewig leben, Dinge können sich ändern.
Monica Macovei
Die Mehrheit der Menschen in Russland scheint Putin zu unterstützen, während eine unbedeutende Opposition umgebracht oder eingesperrt wird.
Katharina Zangerl
Eine ähnliche Entwicklung sehen wir auch in der Türkei. Aber zu den Geschehnissen dort haben wir anders reagiert. Stimmen Sie zu, dass wir nicht strategisch handeln, dass das, was wir tun, nicht klug ist …
Monica Macovei
Auf diese Art verlieren wir.
Katharina Zangerl
Erklären Sie mir, wie?
Monica Macovei
Ich hörte westliche Kollegen 2013 – als die Krim-Krise stattfand – sagen, dass wir uns nicht sorgen müssten – Putin würde sein Land nämlich wirtschaftlich binnen eines Jahres zerstören. Im Unterschied dazu stellte ein polnischer Spion mit Bestimmtheit fest, dass Putin versuche, die EU zu zerstören, da die Polen wüssten, was es bedeute, unter russischer Herrschaft zu leben, wie gelogen werde, wie so getan werde, dass weiß schwarz und schwarz weiß sei, wie sie jedes Versprechen brächen. Er legte nahe, dass keine Vereinbarung mit Russland erzielt werden könne, dass keine Außenpolitik aufgrund einer Vereinbarung mit Russland geführt werden könne.
Katharina Zangerl
Was schlagen Sie demnach vor? Was wäre die ideale Lösung?
Monica Macovei
Wir müssen diese große, immanente Gefahr für unseren politischen Apparat, also russische Propaganda, angehen. Es ist entscheidend, dass wir gegen gezielte Fake News vorgehen, die die Menschen davon überzeugen will, dass die EU „schlecht“ sei.
Katharina Zangerl
Nennen Sie mir ein Beispiel!
Monica Macovei
Teilen und Herrschen – so machen sie es. Russische Propaganda ist eine große Gefahr, Europas Abhängigkeit von russischer Energieversorgung eine andere.
Katharina Zangerl
Was unternehmen wir deswegen? Im Winter will ja niemand frieren, oder?
Monica Macovei
Ich hoffe, dass Sie nicht die Ansicht vertreten, Russland kann uns kontrollieren, damit wir im Winter nicht frieren. Denn das versucht es mit seinem Gas.
Katharina Zangerl
Haben Sie irgendwelche Vorschläge?
Monica Macovei
Die Lösung ist, alternative Energiequellen zu finden. Wir könnten zum Beispiel aus Norwegen importieren oder – so sehe ich es – Atomenergie beziehen.
Katharina Zangerl
Letztere ist unglaublich unbeliebt in Europa, vor allem in Österreich.
Monica Macovei
Sie ist so unglaublich unbeliebt, weil es sehr viele Kampagnen gegen Atomkraftwerke gab, ich weiß. Wissen Sie, dieser Standpunkt ist meine Meinung. Es kann durchaus sein, dass Atomkraftwerke nicht so sicher sind, wie ich denke – vielleicht sollte ich dazu mehr Nachforschungen anstellen. Seien Sie sich gewiss, dass ich die Argumente von Tschernobyl und Fukushima verstehe. Aber behalten Sie bitte im Kopf, dass dies außergewöhnliche Tragödien waren. Wenn Atomkraftwerke ordentlich gebaut und entworfen werden, erzeugen sie viel und sicher Strom. Wir können auch die Mittel für die Erforschung von erneuerbaren Energie erhöhen, wobei ich bezweifle, dass erneuerbare Energie unseren Bedarf ausreichend deckt.
Katharina Zangerl
Aber norwegisches Gas ist weder billig noch ausreichend für uns alle.
Monica Macovei
Schauen Sie, wollen wir ein freies Europa? Wenn ja, dann müssen wir mehr zahlen.
Katharina Zangerl
Unserer bisherigen Unterhaltung kann ich entnehmen, dass Sie eine Unterscheidung zwischen den Ereignissen in Russland und in der Türkei machen. Ich habe den Eindruck, dass Sie in Ihrer Beurteilung voreingenommen, womöglich gar emotional sind, vielleicht aufgrund der historischen Beziehung zwischen Russland und Rumänien… Im Unterschied zu Russland plädieren Sie nicht für einen verstärkten Konfrontationskurs gegenüber der Türkei. Liegt das daran, dass wir ignorieren, dass Erdogan seine Demokratie zerstört und Journalisten einsperrt, weil wir wollen, dass die Türkei die Flüchtlinge behält?
Monica Macovei
Ich sehe das anders. Erdogan wird diese Millionen Flüchtlinge niemals aus der Türkei lassen, weil sie für ihn stimmen werden, sobald er ihnen allmählich die Staatsbürgerschaft verleiht. Denken Sie darüber nach!
Katharina Zangerl
Meinen Sie damit, dass wir als EU nicht in einer Situation sind, in der wir von der derzeitigen türkischen Regierung erpresst werden?
Monica Macovei
Er versucht es, natürlich. Daher müssen wir uns immer im Klaren sein, wie die Hintergrundgedanken sind. Nachdem was er in der Türkei tut, werden nicht viele zu seinen Gunsten stimmen. Zweitens kann er die Flüchtlinge verwenden, um gegen die Kurden vorzugehen. Daher ist es in seinem Interesse, sie zu behalten. Wenn er uns mit Flüchtlingen droht, lachen wir ihm ins Gesicht. Nichtsdestotrotz wollen wir nicht, dass die Türkei Russland zu nahe kommt – das aber aus anderen Gründen.
Katharina Zangerl
Und das geschieht in diesem Moment?
Monica Macovei
Das geschieht in diesem Moment. Wir müssen wissen, dass seine Drohungen nicht echt sind. Wir sollten die Türkei für das, was geschieht – Richter und Gelehrte im Gefängnis, Unternehmen beschlagnahmt und verstaatlicht –, verurteilen. Und ab einem gewissen Punkt können wir uns nicht mehr nur auf Diplomatie allein verlassen. Die Dinge sind kompliziert …

© Daniela De Lorenzo

Katharina Zangerl
Um das festzuhalten: Glauben Sie, dass Russland die Grenze überschritten hat? Was ist mit der Türkei?
Monica Macovei
Beide. Die EU gab beiden dieselben Bedingungen, die es zu respektieren galt, und beide scheiterten daran. Heute haben wir zugleich eine Vereinbarung mit Russland und der Türkei. Russland versucht alles Mögliche, um gegen die EU vorzugehen. Das schließt die Energieversorgung, Propaganda und auch engere Beziehungen mit der Türkei, um sie von der EU wegzubekommen, ein. Das ist die echte Gefahr, nicht das mögliche Eintreffen von einer Million Flüchtlinge. Und dann sind da noch die Vereinigten Staaten und die scheinbar enge Verbindungen zwischen Putin und Trump. Darüber erlangen wir mit jedem Tag mehr Informationen. Aber ich glaube, dass das US-amerikanische Volk relativ immun gegen solche Dinge ist, da in ihnen der Geist der Freiheit und Demokratie stark ist. Ich bezweifle, dass Präsident Trump das verändern kann. Wir haben gesehen, wie aktiv die US-Amerikaner sind. Sie blieben nicht zuhause, sie demonstrierten fast täglich. In Europa sehen wir kaum Demonstrationen – Rumänien ist eine der wenigen Ausnahmen.
Katharina Zangerl
Sie erwähnten den Geist der Demokratie und dass er nicht leicht zerstörbar ist …
Monica Macovei
Er ist in den USA nicht leicht zerstörbar.
Katharina Zangerl
Gilt dasselbe nicht auch für Demokratien generell? Wenn dem in den USA so ist, sollte es doch überall so sein. Sobald Menschen Freiheit genießen, ist es kaum vorstellbar, dass sie diese aufgeben würden.
Monica Macovei
Ich kann nicht erkennen, dass es hier ähnlich ist. Ich glaube, es ist aufgrund von kulturellen Unterschieden.
Katharina Zangerl
Wenn ich Sie wäre, wäre ich nicht so negativ. Schauen Sie sich Rumänien an! Es ist herzerwärmend, wie aktiv die Menschen für ihre Ansichten gekämpft haben. Es war Winter und die Menschen wehrten sich gegen Korruption, weigerten sich, aufzugeben. Ist das nicht der ultimative Beweis, dass es keinen Grund gibt, sich vor ein wenig russischer Propaganda zu fürchten? Wieso sollte eine starke Zivilgesellschaft, die offensichtlich gern in einer lebendigen Demokratie lebt, Opfer von russischer Propaganda werden?
Monica Macovei
(denkt für einen Moment nach) Es gibt einige Unterschiede in der Gesellschaft. Eine Gesellschaft ist niemals uniform. Es gab auch Leute, die gegen die Demonstrationen waren. Schauen Sie sich die Wahlergebnisse in Rumänien an!
Katharina Zangerl
Würden Sie nicht sagen, dass Wahlergebnisse auch durch Berichterstattung beeinflusst und demokratische Stimmen von der Landbevölkerung, von Menschen, die nicht die Gelegenheit hatten, ins Ausland zu fahren, von Menschen, die in Armut leben, als zu „elitär“ wahrgenommen werden? Das hat nichts mit russischer Propaganda zu tun.
Monica Macovei
Das erklärt, wieso es noch immer Fragilität in europäischen Gesellschaften gibt. Ja, ich bin sehr glücklich über das, was in Rumänien geschah. Ich bin glücklich, dass eine mutige Gruppe sich gegen etwas Schreckliches wehrte. Und ich hoffe, dass sie das wieder tun, wenn etwas Schlechtes passiert. Die Demonstranten konnten in dieser Nacht, die Regierung davon abhalten, diese schlechten Gesetze durchzubringen. Aber es ist noch nicht vorbei, die Regierung wird es ein anderes Mal nochmals versuchen. Deshalb müssen wir immer kämpfen.
Katharina Zangerl
Aber sie sind bereit, zu kämpfen! Ist das nicht toll?
Monica Macovei
Ja, es ist toll, aber wir müssen siegen! Der eine verliert, der andere siegt. Wir wollen siegen. Wir wollen in all diesen Ländern siegen.
Katharina Zangerl
Und Sie sagen, dass Russland in der Hinsicht ein Hindernis ist?
Monica Macovei
Das ist es. Ich erinnere mich, dass 2012 – von „Russia Today“ – gesagt wurde, dass die rumänischen Sozialisten drei Personen loswerden müssten, drei Feinde der Sozialisten. Eine davon war ich, weil ich offen dagegen sprach, wie die Sozialisten und Liberalen damals Gesetze missachteten. Genau so funktioniert Russland. Jetzt nochmals: Es war schwer, eine Demokratie zu werden, insbesondere für Länder, die kommunistisch waren. Und es ist leicht, die Demokratie wieder zu verlieren. Ich erinnere mich an eine Entscheidung des Obersten Gerichtshofs in den Vereinigten Staaten in den 60er-Jahren, die schlussfolgerte, dass die größte Gefahr der Demokratie ein träges Volk sei, ein Volk, das nicht reagiert, das nicht auf die Straßen geht, das nur wartet, dass die Dinge sich von selbst ändern …
Katharina Zangerl
Aber die EU-Bürger sind nicht träge, insbesondere nicht die Rumänen. Sie sind sehr wachsam.
Monica Macovei
Ja, und ich bin sehr stolz auf mein Land und seine Leute. Schauen Sie sich zum Beispiel Ungarn an! Dort passieren viel schlimmere Dinge und alle bleiben zuhause. Ein ungarischer Journalist sagte: „Ich bin so neidisch. Wieso gehen die Rumänen auf die Straßen und die Ungarn nicht?“. Diese Aussage macht mich sogar noch stolzer auf meine Landsleute, meine Rumänen. Trotzdem ist noch nichts gewonnen. Jene alten, korrupten politischen Parteien sind noch immer da und sie tun alles Mögliche, um ihre Macht zu sichern. Wir müssen die Wahlgesetze ändern, jenen, wie den Demonstranten, helfen, die in die Politik gehen wollen. Aber ich bin mir nicht sicher, ob die das überhaupt wollen. Und verstehen Sie mich nicht falsch, ich bin nicht pessimistisch, ich bin optimistisch, was Demokratien in Europa anbelangt. Wenn ich das nicht wäre, würde ich nicht weiterkämpfen. Aber nach einem langen Abenteuer in Bosnien, im Kosovo, nach meiner Tätigkeit als Menschenrechtsanwältin für die OSZE, nach Jobs in der Ukraine, über Russland, bis nach Albanien, nach meiner Zeit als Justizministerin in Rumänien, nachdem ich Anti-Korruptionsmaßnahmen gegen Politiker eingeführt habe – sogar gegen meine Kollegen in der Regierung –, habe ich viel Erfahrung gewonnen, die mich Folgendes lehrt: Sei auf das Schlimmste vorbereitet! Jene, die vom Zufall überrascht werden, sind verloren und werden verlieren. Außerdem bin ich der Ansicht, dass man Risiken auf sich nehmen muss, da nichts ohne Risiko getan werden kann. Und wenn man groß träumt, wie die Demonstranten in der Ukraine und Rumänien, dann muss man groß handeln! Man darf nie aufhören, nur nach vorne schauen und seinen Traum verfolgen!
Katharina Zangerl
Im Zusammenhang mit Ihrer Initiative betrachtet, unternehmen Sie Großes, indem Sie vorhaben, Russland zu konfrontieren?
Monica Macovei
Nein, es geht nicht darum, Russland zu konfrontieren. Das ist nicht mein Ziel. Ich sage, dass, wenn man etwas Großes erreichen will, wie zum Beispiel für die Demokratie im eigenen Land zu kämpfen, gegen jene zu kämpfen, die die Demokratie gefährden – das könnte Russland sein, das könnten aber auch korrupte Politiker sein –, darf man keine Angst haben. Angst lähmt einen, hält einen davon ab, etwas zu tun. Also darf man keine Angst haben. Je mehr man scheitert, desto mehr wird man lernen. Sieben Mal scheitern, acht Mal aufstehen. Nun stellen Sie sich das Gegenteil vor: Wenn man nichts im Leben wagt, wie ist das Leben dann?
Katharina Zangerl
Ist das die Art von Wagnis, gepaart mit Ambition und Idealismus, die Sie antreibt?
Monica Macovei
Ich kann stark und stur sein. Ich erinnere mich an meine Zeit als Justizministerin in Rumänien. In dieser Funktion musste ich jedes Gesetz mitunterzeichnen, um dessen Legalität zu garantieren. Meine Kollegen waren oft nervös darüber, ob ich bestimmte Vorschläge überhaupt unterschreibe. Es gab viele Situationen, in denen ich mich weigerte, zu unterzeichnen. Einmal schickte mich der Premierminister sogar aus der Besprechung, mit der Aufforderung, dass ich meine Entscheidung nochmals für eine halbe Stunde lang überdenken solle. Bevor ich den Raum verließ, drehte ich mich um und sagte ihm: „In einer halben Stunde wird’s auch nicht legal sein.“ Das ist das, was ich meine. Sie konnten nichts anderes tun, als mich vom Amt zu entfernen – und das wäre in Ordnung gewesen. Ich habe nicht darum gebeten, Justizministerin zu werden – ich wollte politische Korruption bekämpfen.

Jetzt den Newsletter abonnieren und keine Gespräche mehr verpassen!

Vielen Dank für Ihre Anmeldung!

Durch die weitere Nutzung der Seite stimmen Sie der Verwendung von Cookies zu. Weitere Informationen

Die Cookie-Einstellungen auf dieser Website sind auf "Cookies zulassen" eingestellt, um das beste Surferlebnis zu ermöglichen. Wenn du diese Website ohne Änderung der Cookie-Einstellungen verwendest oder auf "Akzeptieren" klickst, erklärst du sich damit einverstanden.

Schließen