Das war unser letztes Gespräch.

Es sei denn, wir können unser Spendenziel noch erreichen. Wenn Ihnen unsere Gespräche gefallen, helfen Sie uns bitte mit einer kleinen Spende.

Jetzt spenden
Kopf um Krone ist ein ehrenamtliches Projekt, das sich ausschließlich durch Spenden unserer treuen LeserInnen finanziert.
Gespräch N° 59 | Kabinett

Gianni Pittella

„Zunächst, keine Austeritätspolitik mehr“

Europas Rechtsnationalisten sind im Vormarsch und die EU wird zum Sündenbock für die unbestritten vielen Krisen auf dem Kontinent. Die Stimmen, die der EU anlasten, undemokratisch zu sein, verhallen nicht, sondern singen aus allen Ecken des politischen Spektrums. Während die einen in der EU ein undemokratisches, illegitimes Bürokratiemonster sehen, fordern die anderen das Fortschreiten der europäischen Integration. Im Gespräch mit Katharina Zangerl stellt der ehemalige italienische Fraktionsvorsitzende der S&D im Europaparlament, Gianni Pittella, seine Vision vor. Über die Namen der Wähler, zwei Häuser (des Kartenhauses) und welchen Rat er dem Rat mitgibt.

(Hinweis: Dieses Gespräch wurde ursprünglich in englischer Sprache geführt.)
Das Gespräch führte Katharina Zangerl und erschien am 12.02.2019, fotografiert hat Mathias Schweighofer.
Katharina Zangerl
You have been working in the European Parliament for 20 years. Thus, it can be safely assumed that you know this institution quite well. What is your impression of this unique political institution?
Gianni Pittella
Without any doubts, the European Parliament has seen a great increase in power over the past years. I arrived there in 1999 when the Parliament was a consultative institution. The Lisbon Treaty gave the Parliament more power, making it – not completely, but at least in many areas – as important as the Council, particularly in budgetary affairs. I think the next step must be the recognition of the European Parliament as the legislative body of the European Union.
Katharina Zangerl
There is not really a perspective that the Parliament will increase its powers anytime soon. The Council wouldn’t agree …
Gianni Pittella
As of now, we understand that there is a negative attitude towards this idea. However, we cannot lose the perspective in general. We can only restore the confidence of the citizens, if we reinforce the very institution that is directly elected by them.
Katharina Zangerl
But still …
Gianni Pittella
The real risk is that Europa will become much more intergovernmental than it already is. The intergovernmental dimension is already strong. So, if populistic and sovereigntist forces win elections, we will have a Europe where all the powers are with the national governments and any cooperation will depend on whether they want to share powers or not. Without any doubt this would be the end of our European experiment.
The citizens must understand that once Europe fails to have a common position on the migration crisis, financial and economic issues, the national governments become responsible for it. This is the truth.Gianni Pittella on responsibilities
Katharina Zangerl
Do you have a concrete area in mind where you say the European Parliament needs more powers?
Gianni Pittella
I think that the European Parliament should be given the same powers as the Council in all affairs.
Katharina Zangerl
Then they would work against each other …
Gianni Pittella
… not against each other but together as two chambers, two houses of the same institution. My dream is to have a European Government comprising of the Commission and a two-tier legislative arm where the Council and the Parliament share the same powers.
Katharina Zangerl
You are now the second EU Parliamentarian who presents this idea to me. It seems to be a common vision in Brussels. However, national governments haven’t got any interest in agreeing to changing the political system of the European Union.
Gianni Pittella
Yes, but by building a great coalition of progressive forces with centrist and socialist parties, extended by Emmanuel Macron and Alexis Tsipras, we can change the mood. We can show citizens that it works, that we can have a more democratic union. A more democratic union does not equal an intergovernmental union. If we are not able to solve the problem at the Parliament, the national governments become responsible. The citizens must understand that once Europe fails to have a common position on the migration crisis, financial and economic issues, the national governments become responsible for it. This is the truth.

© Mathias Schweighofer

Katharina Zangerl
Do you think that citizens really don’t understand it or is it due to national governments not telling them?
Gianni Pittella
National governments tend to unload the responsibility of their failures on the EU.
Katharina Zangerl
You are a national-level politician now …
Gianni Pittella
Yes, I am, but I haven’t changed my mind.
Katharina Zangerl
But do you see the appeal of blaming Brussels after having changed your perspective?
Gianni Pittella
I still hold to my position and I will try to convince my colleagues on the national level to appropriate it. If every single government retains its powers, only national interests and national egoism will be catered. But if they are called to decide affairs on a European scope, decision-making cultivates both, national and European interests.
National governments tend to unload the responsibility of their failures on the EU.Gianni Pittella on blaming the EU
Katharina Zangerl
Let me ask you something about that: Back then, when you worked in the European Parliament, you were the head of the S&D group (note: i.e. Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats). You are fully aware that not only national interests differ but also interests within a party group, even interests in the Socialist Party group differ. I mean, the Social Democrats from Austria are different than those from Portugal or the Labour Party in the UK. How can one reconcile these interests and put them together in a European vision?
Gianni Pittella
It is a hard job. It was a hard job.
Katharina Zangerl
How can it be done?
Gianni Pittella
You do it with patience, by speaking with all parties involved while trying to form a compromised position.
Katharina Zangerl
So everything is a compromise in the end?
Gianni Pittella
During my presidency my group had positions with 80 or 90 per cent of consensus. Hence, starting from varying positions in terms of geography, politics, culture and economics, we were able to make the large majority within the group to agree on a common position.

© Mathias Schweighofer

Katharina Zangerl
What remains then? If you strip all these different interests, what is left in the remaining 80 to 90 per cent consensus?
Gianni Pittella
A good and innovative position. We have tried to eliminate the extremists. We have eliminated the more distant positions.
Katharina Zangerl
Isn’t there the danger of falling into making boring, non-attractive politics?
Gianni Pittella
No, absolutely not. We were able to make our group to break up the grand coalition. This was not a moderate position. This was a courageous position.
Katharina Zangerl
But this is not attractive for voters, not a reason to vote for a social democratic vision for Europe.
Gianni Pittella
This was not a formal decision, it was a substantial decision. We didn’t share a common vision on social and economics issues with the EPP, especially regarding austerity measures. We have opposed this absurd notion of not investing in public goods. The austerity policies pursued by the EPP group were the cause for many people losing their jobs in Europe.
The austerity policies pursued by the EPP group were the cause for many people losing their jobs in Europe.Gianni Pittella on the damage of austerity policies
Katharina Zangerl
And to this day, we keep talking about crisis in Italy and in Greece. We have many countries in Europe that are not post-austerity.
Gianni Pittella
But we fought against austerity. We argued for a new plan of public investment, and suggested President Juncker to launch it in order to support sustainable growth and the creation of new jobs. By obtaining stable flexibility and growth, we can create the social pillar as a pillar of the politics of the European Union. This could be the basis for consensus among citizens. We are the only force that fights to restore the economy, to create new jobs, to give social rights to the young, children and the elderly. We are the progressive force that can provide for a positive shift in Europe by not destroying it but reforming it.
Katharina Zangerl
Will there be alliances? Will the Social Democrats work together with other progressive pro-European forces?
Gianni Pittella
Yes, we am working on a big alliance with Tsipras and Macron as well as the liberal forces and the Greens, plus all those democratic forces that belong to the EPP family but who are against the “Orbán-isation” of the EPP.
Katharina Zangerl
When you say you are calling for an alliance, is this a concrete project that somebody is working on?
Gianni Pittella
It is not up to me.
Katharina Zangerl
It is up to whom then?
Gianni Pittella
It is up to the president of the PES, S&D group and all other current leaders, including our spitzenkandidat Frans Timmermans. I am no more the leader, I am merely a personality who is having this idea. My idea is to create this alliance. I share and work on it with many personalities such as Matteo Renzi in Italy.

© Mathias Schweighofer

Katharina Zangerl
How could this alliance work? What would be …
Gianni Pittella
The electoral system is proportional, so we will have to make our list autonomous.
Katharina Zangerl
So Social Democrats would be Social Democrats and not …
Gianni Pittella
Every force, every participant will have their own proper list, but we can form a common political platform around some clear points: Firstly, stop austerity …
Katharina Zangerl
German people or Austrian people for example don’t have a real problem with austerity. Do you think they will vote for a political alliance calling for the end of a problem they don’t really have?
Gianni Pittella
This argument is much of concern for Italy, Greece, Spain and Portugal as they are part of Europe. Besides, we need a fiscal reform that allows for sufficient tax collection from multinational corporations, especially web multinationals. This is very important because we have to fight tax havens. Thirdly, we need a common policy on the migration issue. We need Europe as a whole, not every single country trying to manage the situation. At this point, I think this has become very important for some countries. The decisive issue is: Is migration a matter for each country to deal with on their own or for the whole of Europe? Who has to manage it? I hope that Europe will do it.
While the European Parliament has often managed to decide in a short period of time, they were ultimately blocked by the Council.Gianni Pittella on the European Council
Katharina Zangerl
Well, Europe has been trying to manage this for years now. If the Council cannot …
Gianni Pittella
We need to spark a boost from the people. The people have to support our programme. In this programme we must write with clarity that this issue has to be managed by Europe, not by Italy, France, Germany or Austria on their own. This can be achieved by reforming the asylum system and creating legal channels for legal migration through bilateral agreements between the European Commission and respective African countries.
Katharina Zangerl
Imagine a broad, pro-European alliance for the EU Parliament elections initiated by Social Democrats, which sees all the positive aspects the EU brings to us 500 million citizens. I am worried that, in general, left-wing forces in Europe tend to see issues in a more complex manner than right-wing forces. By doing so, there is a higher chance of getting lost in their way of communication and their way of looking for a common position. If you want to create a broad alliance, you will have to make compromises. But then you will end up somewhere in the middle. In the end this could mean that there is not enough appeal for people to vote for this alliance, especially if there is a lack of vision to lead forward.
Gianni Pittella
We have got a vision for the future if we stick to these points. There are other points regarding social issues as well, like unemployment, gender equality, disabilities and cohesion policy. Without a doubt it will be difficult, but we will uphold democracy. Regarding the current situation in Hungary and Poland, we must affirm the principle that a country cannot remain in the European Union if it fails to respect fundamental values of Europe. This is important, because a large part of public opinion in Hungary and Poland disagrees with Orbán and Kaczynski. As progressive forces we can attract these people.

© Mathias Schweighofer

Katharina Zangerl
Who is doing this job? Who is leading these forces? Is there somebody who is working on this?
Gianni Pittella
Many people are fighting for this in Hungary. We are trying to cooperate with them, to include them in alliances. We have to form and forge an alliance not only made by parties but also by personalities outside of parties who are representing public opinion and are trying to defend democracy, media pluralism and the independence of institutions.
Katharina Zangerl
I heard you in an interview saying “I politici più odiati sono quelli che non rispondono” (note: Italian for “The most hated politicians are those who do not respond). I imagine this to be difficult for an EU Parliamentarian as they are far away from their constituents. When they propose a law today, it might take three years to become effective. How do you think the job of an EU Parliamentarian has to be reformed so they can respond to their citizens quicker and more publicly?
Gianni Pittella
One of the most pressing issues is the European Council. While the European Parliament has often managed to decide in a short period of time, they were ultimately blocked by the Council. The most important reform is to establish an equilibrium between the Parliament and the Council, because the current system forces the Parliament, as the second institution, to wait for long negotiations.
Katharina Zangerl
But this will not change any time soon. So, what can the single politician do?
Gianni Pittella
Judging from my experience, I didn’t lose my relationship with my constituents. When I was in Brussels, I kept my relationship through newsletters, Facebook and Twitter. Every weekend I returned to my constituency and met many citizens. I had six regions that formed my constituency, but I still managed to go to every region, roughly all 1,700 cities within 20 years. I can say that I know the names of many of my voters. The most important thing is to keep the confidence of citizens, to maintain a personal and human relationship.
Katharina Zangerl
Sie waren 20 Jahre lang im Europaparlament tätig. Man kann daher davon ausgehen, dass sie diese Institution recht gut kennen. Was ist Ihr Eindruck von dieser einmaligen politischen Institution?
Gianni Pittella
Ohne jedweden Zweifel erfuhr das Europaparlament eine große Zunahme an Macht in den vergangenen Jahren. Als ich 1999 ins Parlament kam, war es noch ein beratendes Organ. Der Vertrag von Lissabon verlieh dem Parlament mehr Befugnisse und machte es damit – nicht gänzlich, aber zumindest in vielen Bereichen – ebenso bedeutend wie den Rat, insbesondere in Haushaltsangelegenheiten. Ich denke, dass der nächste Schritt die Anerkennung des Europaparlaments als gesetzgebendes Organ der Europäischen Union sein muss.
Katharina Zangerl
Es besteht momentan kaum eine Möglichkeit für eine baldige Befugnisausweitung des Parlaments. Der Rat würde nicht zustimmen …
Gianni Pittella
So wie es momentan aussieht, ist die Ablehnung dieser Idee verständlich. Doch in der Gesamtbetrachtung können wir diese Aussicht nicht aufgeben. Wir können das Vertrauen der Bürger nur dann wiederherstellen, wenn wir jene Institution stärken, die von ihnen direkt gewählt wird.
Katharina Zangerl
Aber dennoch …
Gianni Pittella
Das tatsächliche Gefahr ist, dass Europa noch zwischenstaatlicher wird, als es schon ist. Die zwischenstaatliche Dimension ist bereits stark ausgeprägt. Sollten populistische und souveränistische Kräfte daher Wahlen gewinnen, werden wir ein Europa haben, in dem nationale Regierungen sämtliche Macht haben, während jedwede Zusammenarbeit davon abhängt, ob diese ihre Macht teilen wollen oder nicht. Das würde aber zweifelsohne das Ende unseres europäischen Experiments bedeuten.
Die Bürger müssen verstehen, dass, sobald Europa an einer Findung einer gemeinsamen Haltung zur Migrationskrise, zu finanziellen und wirtschaftlichen Fragen scheitert, die nationalen Regierungen die Verantwortung dafür übernehmen müssen. Das ist die Wahrheit.Gianni Pittella über Verantwortlichkeiten
Katharina Zangerl
Denken Sie an ein bestimmtes Gebiet, bei dem das Europaparlament Ihrer Meinung nach mehr Macht erhalten sollte?
Gianni Pittella
Ich denke, dass das Europaparlament dieselben Befugnisse wie der Rat in allen Angelegenheiten haben sollte.
Katharina Zangerl
Dann würden sie gegeneinander arbeiten …
Gianni Pittella
… nicht gegeneinander, sondern miteinander als zwei Kammern, zwei Häuser derselben Institution. Mein Traum ist es, eine europäische Regierung zu haben, die aus der Kommission und einer dualistischen Legislative besteht, in der der Rat und das Parlament dieselben Befugnisse haben.
Katharina Zangerl
Sie sind bereits der zweite EU-Parlamentarier, der mir diesen Gedanken vorschlägt. Es scheint eine weit verbreitete Ansicht in Brüssel zu sein. Dennoch sehe ich keine Möglichkeit, wie diese in absehbarer Zeit realisiert werden könnte, weil die nationalen Regierungen kein Interesse daran haben, darauf einzugehen.
Gianni Pittella
Ja, aber die Schaffung einer großen Koalition aus progressiven Kräften bestehend aus zentristischen und sozialistischen Parteien, erweitert um Emmanuel Macron und Alexis Tsipras, kann diese Stimmungslage ändern. Wir können den Bürgern zeigen, dass es funktioniert, dass es eine demokratischere Union geben kann. Eine demokratischere Union ist nicht mit einer zwischenstaatlichen Union gleichzusetzen. Wenn wir nicht imstande sind, Probleme im Parlament zu lösen, kommt die Verantwortung den nationalen Regierungen zu. Die Bürger müssen verstehen, dass, sobald Europa an einer Findung einer gemeinsamen Haltung zur Migrationskrise, zu finanziellen und wirtschaftlichen Fragen scheitert, die nationalen Regierungen die Verantwortung dafür übernehmen müssen. Das ist die Wahrheit.

© Mathias Schweighofer

Katharina Zangerl
Glauben Sie, dass die Bürger das nicht wirklich verstehen oder es ist vielmehr auf die nationalen Regierungen zurückzuführen, die ihnen dies verschweigen?
Gianni Pittella
Die nationalen Regierungen neigen dazu, die Schuld für ihr Scheitern auf Europa zu schieben.
Katharina Zangerl
Heute sind Sie ein Politiker auf nationaler Ebene …
Gianni Pittella
Ja, das bin ich, aber meine Haltung hat sich nicht verändert.
Katharina Zangerl
Aber sehen Sie die Wirksamkeit, das jetzt zu tun? Nachdem Sie jetzt in einer anderen Funktion sind, erkennen Sie, wie verlockend es ist, Brüssel zu beschuldigen?
Gianni Pittella
Ich bleibe bei meiner Position und versuche meine Kollegen auf nationaler Ebene davon zu überzeugen, diese zu übernehmen. Wenn jede einzelne Regierung an ihrer Macht festhält, werden nur nationale Interessen und Egoismen bedient. Aber sobald sie dazu berufen sind, auf europäischer Ebene zu entscheiden, kultivieren diese Entscheidungsprozesse nationale und europäische Interessen.
Die nationalen Regierungen neigen dazu, die Schuld für ihr Scheitern auf Europa zu schieben.Gianni Pittella über die Schuldsuche bei der EU
Katharina Zangerl
Wenn ich Sie dazu etwas fragen darf: Damals als Sie im Europaparlament tätig waren, waren Sie der Vorsitzende der S&D-Fraktion (Abk. für Fraktion der Progressiven Allianz der Sozialdemokraten im Europäischen Parlament; Anm.). Sie sind sich vollends bewusst, dass nicht nur nationale Interessen verschieden sind, sondern auch jene innerhalb einer Fraktion, sogar in der sozialistischen Fraktion. Interessen unterscheiden sich innerhalb einzelner Länder wie auch unter verschiedenen Ländern. Beispielsweise sind die österreichischen Sozialdemokraten grundsätzlich anders als jene aus Portugal oder die britische Labour Party. Wie gedenken Sie diese Interessen miteinander in Einklang unter einer gemeinsamen europäischen Vision zu bringen? Ist so etwas überhaupt möglich?
Gianni Pittella
Es ist eine schwierige Aufgabe. Es war eine schwierige Aufgabe.
Katharina Zangerl
Wie bewältigen Sie diese?
Gianni Pittella
Indem man geduldig mit allen involvierten Parteien spricht, um einen Kompromiss zu finden.
Katharina Zangerl
Also ist alles schlussendlich ein Kompromiss?
Gianni Pittella
Während meiner Präsidentschaft hatten wir in meiner Fraktion Positionen mit einem Konsensus von 80 bis 90 Prozent. Man kann daher sagen, dass wir es schafften, ausgehend von unterschiedlichen geographischen, politischen, kulturellen und wirtschaftlichen Standpunkten, eine große Mehrheit hinter eine gemeinsame Position zusammenzubringen.

© Mathias Schweighofer

Katharina Zangerl
Was bleibt dann noch übrig? Wenn Sie alle verschiedenen Interessen aussortieren, was ist dann noch im verbleibenden 80- bis 90-Prozent-Konsensus vorhanden?
Gianni Pittella
Eine gute und innovative Position. Wir haben versucht, die Extremen zu eliminieren. Wir haben die stark abweichenden Positionen eliminiert.
Katharina Zangerl
Besteht nicht die Gefahr, dass man anfängt, langweilige, unattraktive Politik zu machen?
Gianni Pittella
Nein, überhaupt nicht. Wir konnten unsere Fraktion dazu bewegen, die große Koalition zu sprengen. Das war keine moderate Position. Das war eine mutige Position.
Katharina Zangerl
Aber das ist keine attraktive Vision für die Wähler, um für eine sozialdemokratische Vision in Europa zu stimmen.
Gianni Pittella
Das ist keine formale Entscheidung. Es war eine grundlegende Entscheidung. Wir hatten andere Ansichten zu sozialen und wirtschaftlichen Themen als die EVP, insbesondere die Austeritätspolitik betreffend. Wir sind gegen den absurden Irrglauben, nicht in öffentliche Güter zu investieren. Die von der EVP geforderte Austeritätspolitik war die Ursache für die Arbeitslosigkeit vieler Menschen europaweit.
Die von der EVP geforderte Austeritätspolitik war die Ursache für die Arbeitslosigkeit vieler Menschen europaweit.Gianni Pittella über die Schäden der Austeritätspolitik
Katharina Zangerl
Und bis heute sprechen wir über die Krisen in Italien und Griechenland. Es gibt viele Länder, die noch an Austerität festhalten.
Gianni Pittella
Wir haben gegen Austerität gekämpft. Wir standen für neue öffentliche Investitionen ein und schlugen es Präsident Juncker vor, um nachhaltiges Wachstum und die Schaffung neuer Arbeitsplätze unterstützen zu können. Indem wir stabile Flexibilität und Wachstum erzielen, können wir die soziale Säule als eine Säule der Politik der Europäischen Union aufstellen. Das könnte die Grundlage für Konsensus unter den Bürgern sein. Wir sind die einzige Kraft, die für die Wiederherstellung der Wirtschaft, die Schaffung neuer Arbeitsplätze, die Gewährleistung sozialer Rechte für Junge, Kinder und Ältere einstehen. Wir sind die progressive Kraft, die Europa einen positiven Schub geben kann, ohne es zu zerstören, sondern indem wir es reformieren.
Katharina Zangerl
Wird es Allianzen geben? Werden die Sozialdemokraten mit anderen progressiven proeuropäischen Kräften zusammenarbeiten?
Gianni Pittella
Ja, wir arbeiten momentan an einer großen Allianz mit Tsipras und Macron wie auch mit liberalen Kräften und den Grünen sowie jenen, die der EVP angehören, jedoch gegen die Orbánisierung ihrer Partei sind.
Katharina Zangerl
Wenn Sie von einer Allianz sprechen, ist das ein konkretes Vorhaben, an dem jemand arbeitet?
Gianni Pittella
Es hängt nicht von mir ab.
Katharina Zangerl
Von wem hängt es dann ab?
Gianni Pittella
Es hängt von den Vorsitzenden der SPE (Sozialdemokratische Partei Europas, Anm.), der S&D-Fraktion und deren derzeitigen Führungspersonen ab, wie unter anderem unser Spitzenkandidat Frans Timmermans. Ich bin keine Führungsperson mehr, bloß jemand, der lediglich diese Idee hat. Meine Idee ist es, diese Allianz zu schaffen. Ich teile und arbeite gemeinsam an ihr mit vielen Persönlichkeiten wie Matteo Renzi in Italien.

© Mathias Schweighofer

Katharina Zangerl
Wie könnte diese Allianz funktionieren? Was wäre …
Gianni Pittella
Das Wahlsystem ist proportional, daher müssen wir unsere Liste autonom gestalten.
Katharina Zangerl
Also sind Sozialdemokraten dann Sozialdemokraten und nicht …
Gianni Pittella
Jede Kraft, jedes Mitglied wird eine eigene Liste haben, aber wir können eine gemeinsame politische Plattform schaffen, die über einige klare Punkte verfügt: Zunächst, keine Austeritätspolitik mehr …
Katharina Zangerl
Die deutsche und österreichische Bevölkerung zum Beispiel haben kein Problem mit Austeritätspolitik. Sie werden keine Allianz wählen, die für ihr Ende eintritt.
Gianni Pittella
Diese Angelegenheit ist von großer Bedeutung für Italien, Griechenland, Spanien und Portugal, zumal sie Teil Europas sind. Weiters benötigen wir eine Fiskalreform, die eine hinreichende Besteuerung multinationaler Konzerne, insbesondere der Internetmultis, ermöglicht. Das ist überaus wichtig, weil wir Steueroasen bekämpfen müssen. Drittens brauchen wir eine gemeinsame Migrationspolitik. Wir brauchen Europa als Ganzes und keine Staaten, die auf eigene Faust versuchen, die Lage zu beherrschen. Ich denke, dass dies an diesem Punkt für einige Länder sehr wichtig geworden ist. Die entscheidende Frage ist: Soll sich jedes Land einzeln um die Migrationsthematik kümmern oder Europa als Ganzes? Wer hat sich darum zu sorgen? Ich hoffe, dass Europa dies tun wird.
Während das Europaparlament es oftmals schafft, binnen kurzer Zeit Sachen zu beschließen, werden diese letztlich vom Rat blockiert.Gianni Pittella über den Europäischen Rat
Katharina Zangerl
Nun ja, Europa versucht schon seit Jahren sich darum zu kümmern. Wenn der Rat es nicht schafft, …
Gianni Pittella
Wir brauchen den Funken aus der Bevölkerung. Die Menschen müssen unser Programm unterschützen. In diesem Programm müssen wir mit aller Deutlichkeit festhalten, dass diese Thematik eine europäische Angelegenheit ist und keine einzig italienische, französische, deutsche oder österreichische. Um das zu erreichen, bedarf es einer Asylreform und legaler Wege für legale Migration im Zuge von bilateralen Abkommen zwischen der Europäischen Kommission und den jeweiligen afrikanischen Staaten.
Katharina Zangerl
Stellen wir uns seine breite, proeuropäische Allianz für die Europaparlamentswahlen vor, die von Sozialdemokraten ins Leben gerufen wurde und all die positiven Aspekte, die die EU uns 500 Millionen Bürger ermöglicht, hervorhebt. Ich befürchte, dass linke Kräfte in Europa allgemein dazu neigen, die Themen weitaus komplizierter zu betrachten, als dies rechte Kräfte tun. Dadurch besteht eine höhere Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass man an der Kommunikation und an der Findung eines gemeinsamen Standpunktes scheitert. Wenn man eine breite Allianz schaffen will, muss man Kompromisse eingehen, da man sonst irgendwo in der Mitte landet. Am Ende könnte es die Leute nicht davon überzeugen, diese Allianz zu wählen, insbesondere wenn es an einer Führungsvision mangelt.
Gianni Pittella
Wir haben eine Zukunftsvision, wenn wir an diesen Punkten festhalten. Es gibt auch andere Punkte im sozialen Bereich wie Arbeitslosigkeit, Geschlechtergleichberechtigung, Invalidität und Regionalpolitik. Das ist zweifelsohne schwierig, aber wir müssen die Demokratie hochhalten. In der derzeitigen Lage in Ungarn und Polen müssen wir das Prinzip bekräftigen, dass ein Land kein Teil der Europäischen Union sein kann, dass grundlegende Werte Europas missachtet. Das ist eine wichtige Position, weil ein großer Teil der öffentlichen Meinung in Ungarn und Polen Orbán und Kacyznski widerspricht. Als progressive Kraft können wir diese Menschen ansprechen.

© Mathias Schweighofer

Katharina Zangerl
Wer übernimmt diese Aufgabe? Wer führt diese Kräfte an? Gibt es jemanden, der diese Vision hat und versucht …?
Gianni Pittella
Viele Menschen in Ungarn kämpfen dafür. Wir versuchen mit ihnen zusammenzuarbeiten, sie in Allianzen einzubringen. Wir müssen Allianzen bilden und gestalten, die nicht bloß aus Parteien bestehen, sondern auch aus Persönlichkeiten außerhalb von Parteien, die die öffentliche Meinung repräsentieren und versuchen, Demokratie, Medienpluralismus und die Unabhängigkeit von Institutionen zu verteidigen.
Katharina Zangerl
Ich habe einige Videos während der Vorbereitung angeschaut, um Sie und Ihre Haltung ein bisschen zu verstehen. Besonders gefiel mir Ihr Ausspruch „I politici più odiati sono quelli che non rispondono“ (italienisch für „Die meist gehassten Politiker sind diejenigen, die nicht antworten“, Anm.). Wie könnte ein Mitglied des Europaparlaments Ihrer Ansicht nach auf Bürger eingehen? Sie sind weit von ihren Wählern entfernt. Wenn sie heute etwas vorbringen, kann es drei Jahre dauern, bis daraus ein Gesetz wird. Wie müsste die Tätigkeit als EU-Parlamentarier Ihrer Meinung nach reformiert werden, um diese zu verbessern, sodass schneller und öffentlicher auf die Bürger eingegangen werden kann?
Gianni Pittella
Eines der dringlichsten Probleme stellt der Europäische Rat dar. Während das Europaparlament es oftmals schafft, binnen kurzer Zeit Sachen zu beschließen, werden diese letztlich vom Rat blockiert. Die wichtigste Reform ist es, ein Gleichgewicht zwischen Parlament und Rat zu schaffen, da im derzeitigen System das Parlament als zweites Organ von langandauernden Verhandlungen aufgehalten wird.
Katharina Zangerl
Aber das wird sich in absehbarer Zeit nicht ändern. Was kann daher der einzelne Politiker tun?
Gianni Pittella
Aus eigener Erfahrung kann ich sagen, dass ich die Beziehung zu meinen Wählern nicht verloren habe. Als ich in Brüssel war, habe ich die Beziehung mittels Newslettern, Facebook und Twitter aufrechterhalten. Jedes Wochenende kehrte ich zu meinem Wahlkreis zurück und traf mich mit vielen Bürgern. Dieser Wahlkreis bestand aus sechs Regionen. Dennoch schaffte ich es, jede Region, rund 1.700 Städte binnen 20 Jahre zu besuchen. Ich kann behaupten, viele meiner Wähler beim Namen zu kennen. Das Wichtigste ist es, das Vertrauen der Bürger zu bewahren sowie eine persönliche und menschliche Beziehung zu pflegen.